Millions Recovered | Former Insurance Company Attorneys | Decades of experience

Our Team of Attorneys has Six Decades of Combined Experience handling complex and catastrophic cases in the fields of maritime, personal injury, insurance, and more.

Licensed in Louisiana, Texas, Florida, Georgia, and Connecticut

Featured Case Results

  • $2,400,000Settlement

    Insurance

  • $900,000Thousand

    Insurance

  • $750,000Thousand

    Personal Injury

  • $400,000Thousand

    Maritime and Offshore Injuries

  • $300,000Thousand

    Insurance

  • $288,000Thousand

    Insurance

  • $250,000Thousand

    Business Tort and Litigation

  • $200,000Thousand

    Business Tort and Litigation

  • $182,000Thousand

    Insurance

When the odds are stacked up

against you,

THE JOHNS LAW FIRM is here.

We understand that the last thing you want to think about is hiring an attorney. If you do, you should hire a firm with the knowledge, drive, and experience needed to see your case through to the end.

We are a dynamic young firm that for years worked for many of our adversaries – insurance companies, financial institutions, and large corporations. Knowing our opponent’s playbook allows us to level the playing field and helps us maximize results for our clients.

We are a strong team of attorneys that has extensive experience in the fields of maritime law, personal injury litigation, and insurance recovery. We have recovered millions for the victims of catastrophic events. Our team works both efficiently and hard to exceed our client’s expectations.

If you are ready to stop the stress and recover financially, schedule a free, non-comital consultation with our attorneys today.

Client Testimonials

  • These guys are phenomenal! They responded to my concerns quickly, succinctly, and most importantly, correctly.

    Fred S.

  • I was injured while a passenger on a cruise ship. Jeremiah worked hard on my case beginning to end. I was surprised how easy it was to get in touch with him. After about a year of fighting the cruise ship company, I received a large six-figure settlement.

    Anonymous

  • My house was seriously damaged during a storm. After fighting the insurance company for several months, I hired The Johns Firm, LLC. Jeremiah filed a lawsuit against the insurance company and a few months later, my case settled for several hundred thousand dollars.

    Margaret L.

  • Tony is clearly one of the hardest working, meticulous, driven and expert representatives that one could have in the Lone Star State.

    Stan and Donna H.

  • The Johns Firm showed us how to maximize out recovery from a construction defect and insurance claim. We didn’t realize we had any right to recovery before they took on our case. Thanks to them, we were able to repair our home and walked away with a sizable amount in our pockets.

    Irene H.

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Attorney Portrait

Texas Insurance Code 541 and 542

| Read Time: 3 minutes

In Texas, insurance companies owe a wide range of duties to their policyholders aimed at ensuring claims are promptly adjusted and settled in a fair manner. An insurance company that breaches these duties can be liable to the policyholder for additional damages, penalties, and attorney’s fees. The reason insurance companies are so closely regulated is the inherent advantage they have over their insureds who are depending on coverage from the insurance company that they paid premiums for.  In Texas, there are two separate bodies of law that penalize insurance companies for acting in bad faith. The first is a common law implied covenant of good faith that requires an insurance company to treat you honestly and fairly. In addition, Chapter 541 of the Texas Insurance Code lays out in detail when an insurer engages in an unfair method of competition and unfair or deceptive acts or practices. In addition, Chapter 542 details an insurer’s duties to pay claims in a timely manner. If you believe your insurance company acted in bad faith, you should contact a Texas insurance attorney as soon as possible. Proving a Bad Faith Claim in Texas When proving a bad faith claim in Texas, it is important to understand that you have the burden of proof. This means that you, with the help of your lawyer, must demonstrate how the facts of your case meet the requirements of a bad faith claim. There are two ways that you can prove your bad faith claim: either as a common law bad faith claim or a statutory bad faith claim. Common-Law Bad Faith Claim To prove a common law bad faith claim, you must show that your insurance company denied or delayed your claim even though liability was reasonably clear. The Texas Supreme Court recognized a common law claim for bad faith in 1983. English v. Fischer, 660 S.W.2d 521 (Tex. 1983). Since then, the Texas Supreme Court has upheld the common law claim for bad faith despite the passage of statutes prohibiting insurers from engaging in certain actions that give rise to specific penalties.  Statutory Bad Faith Claim To prove a statutory bad faith claim, you must prove that your insurance company violated Texas insurance code 541 or 542.  Causes of Action You Can Bring Under Chapters 541  There are several different causes of action you can bring against your insurance company under Chapter 541 of the Texas Insurance Code. These claims can be brought against both your insurance company and insurance professionals, such as adjusters.  Misrepresentation of a material fact or policy provision; Failing to reach a settlement in good faith when liability is reasonably clear; Failing to reasonably explain why a claim was denied; Failing to affirm or deny coverage within a reasonable time; and Refusing to pay a claim without conducting a reasonable investigation. A Texas insurance lawyer can help you determine which of these causes of action is best suited to your case. First-Party Bad Faith Claims It is important to understand the type of bad faith claim that applies to your case. A Texas insurance attorney can help you figure out which type of claim you should file. First-Party Bad Faith Claim A first-party bad faith claim arises when you file a claim against your own insurance company after an accident or event. For example, you have a house fire and file a claim with your insurance company for the damage to your dwelling and personal property. If your insurance company fails to settle your claim when it is clearly liable under the terms of the policy, you can file a first-party bad faith claim against your insurance company. Damages There are two major types of damages available in bad faith suits against an insurance company. These include actual damages and attorney fees and court costs. Actual damages refer to the financial harm you suffered as a result of your insurance company acting in bad faith. It is also important to note that you can recover three times your actual damages if you can prove your insurance company knowingly violated chapter 541 of the Texas insurance code. A Texas insurance attorney can help you determine the amount of damages you could recover. What Should You Do If You Believe Your Insurance Company Has Acted in Bad Faith? If you believe your insurance company has acted in bad faith, you should contact a Texas insurance lawyer today. We at The Johns Law Firm will determine the appropriate avenue to prove your bad faith claim. We will fight your insurance company and strive to get you the compensation you deserve. Contact us today to schedule your free consultation.

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Attorney Portrait

Bad Faith Insurance in Texas: Know Your Rights

| Read Time: 5 minutes

In Texas, insurance companies owe a wide range of duties to their policyholders aimed at ensuring claims are promptly adjusted and settled in a fair manner. An insurance company that breaches these duties can be liable to the policyholder for additional damages, penalties, and attorney’s fees beyond what is owed under the insurance policy. The reason insurance companies are so closely regulated is the inherent advantage they have over their insureds who are depending on the coverage they paid for.  In Texas, there are two separate bodies of law that penalize insurance companies for acting in bad faith. The first is a common law implied covenant of good faith that requires an insurance company treat you honestly and fairly. In addition, Chapter 541 of the Texas Insurance Code lays out in detail when an insurer engages in an unfair method of competition and unfair or deceptive acts or practices. Somewhat related is Chapter 542 of the Texas Insurance Code, which provides deadlines for an insurer to pay and settle claims. If you believe your insurance company acted in bad faith, you should contact a Texas insurance attorney as soon as possible. Proving a Bad Faith Claim in Texas When proving a bad faith claim in Texas, it is important to understand that you have the burden of proof. This means that you, with the help of your lawyer, must demonstrate how the facts of your case meet the requirements of a bad faith claim.  There are two ways that you can prove your bad faith claim: either as a common law bad faith claim or a statutory bad faith claim. Common-Law Bad Faith Claim To prove a common law bad faith claim, you must show that your insurance company denied or delayed your claim even though liability was reasonably clear. The Texas Supreme Court recognized a common law claim for bad faith in 1983. English v. Fischer, 660 S.W.2d 521 (Tex. 1983). Since then, the Texas Supreme Court has upheld the common law claim for bad faith despite the passage of statutes prohibiting insurers from engaging in certain actions that give rise to specific penalties.  Statutory Bad Faith Claim Under Chapter 541 There are several different causes of action you can bring against your insurance company under Chapter 541 of the Texas Insurance Code. These claims include:   Misrepresentation of a material fact or policy provision; Failing to reach a settlement in good faith when liability is reasonably clear; Failing to reasonably explain why a claim was denied; Failing to affirm or deny coverage within a reasonable time; and Refusing to pay a claim without conducting a reasonable investigation. Insurance companies, adjusters, and other personnel can be sued and held liable for bad faith insurance claim handling. There are numerous business practices that insurance companies may engage in that fall under the umbrella of bad faith. For example:  Undervaluing claims Delaying adjustment of claims Delaying payment of claims Misrepresenting terms of the insurance policy Pressuring a policyholder not to hire an attorney Ignoring portions of the claim during investigation and adjustment Canceling or changing the terms of insurance after making a claim Failure to communicate with the policyholder Not providing reasons for the insurance company’s determinations Failing to assign qualified personnel to adjust and investigate your claim Request unnecessary information to delay the claim adjustment process Alleging the insured engaged in fraud or criminal behavior without reasonable justification Bad faith normally requires you to prove that the insurance company didn’t just make an error, but that it engaged in intentional or grossly negligent conduct aimed at harming its insured. I often like to classify bad faith claims as either being obvious or not so obvious. An example of an obvious bad faith claim is where the insurance company knowingly makes misrepresentations to a policyholder. For example, the insurance company denies your insurance claim after being told by its own experts that the claim is covered by your policy. Another example of obvious bad faith may be an insurance company that misrepresents the terms of your insurance policy or changes the terms of the insurance policy without your knowledge.  Not so obvious bad faith often deals with the valuation of your claim. In many cases, an insurance company will estimate the value of your claim on the lower end. Although frustrating, this itself may not be bad faith. You need to compare the insurance company’s investigation and reports to what you are claiming. If your dispute with the insurance company is over the value of specific items that you are claiming, there may not be bad faith if the insurance company can prove that its valuation was reasonable. However, if the insurance company has ignored portions of your claim or estimated your damage in ways that are unreasonable, you may have a good claim for bad faith.  Damages for Bad Faith Conduct and Unfair Trade Practices If you establish bad faith, the following damages can be recovered:  Treble Damages, i.e. three times the amount the insurance company should have paid you. To get treble damages, courts tend to require that you prove the insurance company intentionally or knowingly acted in bad faith.  Attorney’s fees, interest, and court costs.  Interest on the delayed payments. Don’t Forget About the Prompt Payment Statute Chapter 542 of the Texas Insurance Code creates a number of requirements for insurers to respond to, investigate, and pay insurance claims. These requirements are separate and apart from the bad faith practices prohibited under Chapter 541. If an insurer violates this law, you are entitled to recover attorney’s fees and damages in the form of an annual 18% penalty.  To collect these damages, the law requires: (1) the policyholder had a claim under the policy; (2) the insurer is liable for the claim; and (3) the insurer failed to comply with a requirement of the statute.”  There are a number of specific requirements that you need to meet to collect attorney’s fees and damages for breach of the prompt payment...

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Attorney Portrait

What Is Double Indemnity?

| Read Time: 2 minutes

A double indemnity clause is a type of provision found in many life insurance and accidental death and dismemberment policies. This type of clause allows for additional payout in the event of accidental death. However, insurance companies often make it difficult to classify the death as “accidental,” preventing you from getting the payment you may be entitled to. Contact the Johns Law Firm today to see if you qualify for a double indemnity claim and find out how we can help.  Double Indemnity Life Insurance Definition Double indemnity life insurance clauses require an insurer to provide a larger payout if the insured died as a result of accidental death. Very often, this additional payment will be double or even triple the amount that is provided for in the policy. Approximately 5% of all deaths in the United States are the result of an accident. Life insurance companies offer additional payouts for accidental deaths due, in part, to the low likelihood that you will die due to an accident.  Sometimes, however, insurers will try to deny double indemnity claims to avoid making additional payments that may actually be owed.  What Qualifies as an Accidental Death Determining what constitutes an “accidental death” is more complicated than you might think. Insurance policies will frequently carve out many exceptions to coverage under the policy. Below are some examples of deaths that generally qualify as accidental:  Murder,  Motor vehicle accidents,  Drowning, Falls, and Any other death not considered an “accident” by the insurer. But, for most causes of accidental death, the insurer will attempt to find an exception to coverage. The following are some common exceptions to coverage for a double indemnity claim:  Murder of the insured by a beneficiary under the policy; Accidents caused by the insured’s own alleged negligence; Accidental death where the insured was intoxicated; Suicide; and Natural causes. Even though there are many exceptions to coverage, this does not always mean that your claim should be denied. Having a lawyer who understands what does and does not qualify as an accidental death can greatly improve your chances of having your double indemnity claim paid.  What Can I Do If the Insurance Company Denies My Claim? Unfortunately, many insurers will deny double indemnity claims that should be paid. However, even if your claim is denied, you may be able to contest it.  For example, an insurer might deny a double indemnity claim based on their determination that the insured committed suicide. But, if you can prove that the death was, in fact, an accident and not a suicide, then your claim should not be denied. Likewise, an insurer might deny payment of the double indemnity benefit because it believes the accidental death was the result of the insured’s own negligence or intoxication. While these may seem like fairly standard exclusions, insurers can stretch their meanings to deny coverage. Why? A double indemnity payment is a huge hit on an insurer and it will do anything it can to avoid doing so. The good news is that having an experienced lawyer in your corner to argue on your behalf can make all the difference.  Dealing with the aftermath of a loved one’s death is challenging, and navigating a double indemnity insurance claim and subsequent denial can make matters feel even worse. At the Johns Law Firm, we want to make sure you feel taken care of.  If you or someone you know has had a double indemnity claim denied by an insurer, contact us today to see how we can help. 

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